The Extended Edition Epidemic

Taking a look at Hollywood's big sequel and remake lines

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Take a look at the movies out now. How many of them are sequels, reboots, or remakes? There seems to be a severe lack of creativity in movie studios. Instead of fresh and new ideas, producers are creating more reboots and sequels than ever. Right now, there’s a new Fast and Furious, a Beauty and the Beast remake, a Spiderman reboot, and sequels for Star Wars, Thor, and Planet of the Apes either out or coming out soon. Companies like Disney still produce original movies like Moana and Zootopia, but over time have taken less risks by continuing to add more sequels to blockbuster franchises like Star Wars and the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU).

 

According to a post made by Lights Film School, since 1981, Hollywood has produced less and less original titles. In 1981, out of the top ten grossing hits, two were sequels, and the rest were original movies. In 2001, there were two original titles, five sequels, and three adaptations. Finally, in 2011, there were zero new titles, eight sequels, and two adaptations. This is a 300% increase in sequels and a 100% decrease in original titles.

 

Certain franchises have lasted so long to the point where they just become ‘that yearly movie’, and many have come to expect a new sequel every year. A series such as Fast & Furious, which some people look down as the most mundane of movie franchises while others adore it, is a product of a continuous overuse of the sequels.

 

It might just be that people want to see their favorite actors. For example, some people go to the Fast & Furious movies to see Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, but, in an effort to see their favorite actors, people may not know that they are funding a line of sequels.

 

Why is this a problem? If the sequels are good, than why does it matter? Well, to start, some say it’s boring to see the same movies in theaters over and over again. New audiences might never know what it’s like to see new ideas and be surprised while watching a movie. Another problem is that if a story has no conclusion or resolution, some might think that the movie no point. If a series goes on forever with more and more sequels, it loses the whole thing it’s working towards; an ending.

Both sides share the blame for the constant sequels. A desire to see your  favorite actors plus (in some cases) uncreativity, will always yield the same result. Classics such as Star Wars are still going strong because of nostalgia. Newer movies like the MCU movies and Fast and Furious movies are still fresh in many minds. If we pay for sequels, we will get more sequels. Unless the money stops rolling in, we will continue to get more of the same.

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The Extended Edition Epidemic