Students and teachers have different views on the school dress code

Ms.+Elizabeth+Donovan%2C+Carson%27s+librarian.
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Students and teachers have different views on the school dress code

Ms. Elizabeth Donovan, Carson's librarian.

Ms. Elizabeth Donovan, Carson's librarian.

Ms. Elizabeth Donovan, Carson's librarian.

Ms. Elizabeth Donovan, Carson's librarian.

Kai Chang and Kaitlyn Baldwin

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Some students at Carson Middle School have disagreements with the school dress code, but administrators say it’s necessary to maintain a business-like atmosphere.

Students receive information about the dress code at the beginning of each year. 

“It’s changed a lot since I’ve been at Carson,” said Ms. Donovan, one of Rachel Carson Middle School’s librarians.

When Ms. Donovan was at Rachel Carson, the dress code was different. She said the only thing guys could get dress coded for were saggy pants. Yet, girls weren’t even allowed to wear leggings. It mainly focused on what girls were wearing. While the dress code has changed over the years, some say more changes are needed.

“If you look at the wording in the dress code, it almost mainly targets girls,” she said.

As a librarian, Ms. Donovan has never dress coded a student. Even when she was a teacher she rarely did. 

“Administrators usually deal with the dress code,” said Mr. Stokes, principal of Rachel Carson. “It’s not teachers’ jobs when they’re busy with more important things.”

According to the principal, teachers can point out dress code violations, but administrators usually deal with it. Teachers can report students to the administrators. Then, they can ask them to change if you have a change of clothes, or lend you a pair. The parents can also bring students an extra change of clothes. He added that you can avoid being dress coded by wearing appropriate clothes to school.

“Our goal is to make sure kids are in class and dressed appropriately,” says Mr. Stokes.

Mr. Stokes thinks that kids should be dressed appropriately for school, but an administrator shouldn’t scout the halls for dress code violations. However, if a student has been told not to wear a certain item but wears it again, the administrators will have a different conversation with them because the offence has changed to something more serious: Disobedience. 

Some people think that nondistracting hats or beanies and other clothing trends should be allowed. Mr. Stokes disagrees.

“There’s a time for style after school or on the weekends,” he says.

Some students have argued that they would like to be stylish during school. However, Mr. Stokes believes that school is your place for business, so dress as you would for work.

The administration has put in place a dress code that allows students and teachers enough flexibility to dress appropriately.

“I think the dress code is fine as it is,” says Mr. Stokes.

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